German Historical Institute London:
Bibliography: Research on British History
in the Federal Republic of Germany

 
PETER WENDE, Grossbritanien 1500-2000, Oldenbourg Grundriss der Geschichte, 32 (München: R. Oldenbourg, 2001), X + 235 pp. €39.80 (hardcover) or €24.80 (paperback).

ISBN 3-486-56511-7 (hardcover)
ISBN 3-486-56180-4 (paperback)

GHIL
Library shelfmark:

Ka 2020(32
Lesesaal

This survey of modern British history by the former director of the German Historical Institute London appears in a series of textbooks widely used by teachers and students in German schools and universities. Each volume is divided into two main parts providing readers first with a comprehensive and up-to-date account of historical events and then acquainting them with fundamental problems and recent trends in research. In contrast to his predecessors, however, Peter Wende does not follow a chronological narrative in the first part of his book, but adopts a systematic approach. In separate chapters he gives concise overviews of economy and society, constitution and structures of political power, church and religion, foreign affairs in Europe, and finally Empire and Commonwealth, each covering the period from 1485 to the present day. The second part of the book starts by discussing the general problem of British as opposed to English history. The following eleven chapters concentrate on debates and developments which have dominated historical research over recent decades in a particular field. They encompass, to name but a few, the controversy about the 'Tudor Revolution in Government', the disputed interpretations of both the Reformation and the English revolution, the establishment of new areas of research such as 'gender history', reappraisals of the Industrial Revolution, the argument about 'Britain's Decline' and recent theories of imperialism and decolonization. An extensive bibliography of primary sources as well as secondary literature and a political chronology close the book.

Michael Schaich
 


 
Back to: Bibliography Issue 6
Back to Homepage